Doctor Stops Taking Insurance, Cuts Prices in Half

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I’m not sure how long this would be allowed to last since Obamacare will require everybody to have insurance, and there would be less incentive to go to someone like this who no longer wants to work for the government or insurance companies. Michael Ciampi is a family doctor in South Portland, Maine who left Mercy health system in 2003 to operate his own private practice. He didn’t like the hospital setting, because “you have a lot of administrators that [control]what you do.” He doesn’t like the idea of hospital consolidation, because like with anything else, “competition is good.” What he wanted was more autonomy and more flexibility. In short, freedom.

Last month, he officially stopped taking payments from Medicare, Medicaid and all other third party commercial insurance companies. This is what he said:

“As a private practice, with what’s coming with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, the regulations that are coming out are coming out several pages a week, and there’s no way that small private practices are going to be able to comply with all these regulations. So what we’re doing now, we’re not taking insurance, we’re asking people to pay at the time of service, just like you would pay…your lawyer or your plumber. Now, I work for patients. I don’t work for the government, and I don’t work for insurance companies.”

He said that if more doctors did this, we’d see the price of healthcare go down. He’s right. And the quality would go up, because doctors would be vying for customers. The government’s so involved with the healthcare industry that competition is being slowly outlawed. The government doesn’t want there to be any competition, because they want to control everything.

Read the rest at Political Outcast

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